Catering

Catering & Dietary Restrictions

31 Oct , 2014  

catering
Wedding guest lists will invariably include people of all ages and habits, many with special dietary needs. I’ve noticed that the larger the guest list is, the larger the need for special considerations will be.To start with, your guests should be asked if they have any special dietary needs on wedding invitations and RSVPs. In this way, you can address some of their concerns ahead of time. They can be offered the option of bringing their own food or sending you examples of what they might want.At a wedding table, I make sure to provide some basic foods substances that can be consumed by people on a wide range of diets. Alternative sweeteners like stevia, aspartame and saccharine always should be provided. The tables should also have some low-calorie salad dressings like balsamic vinegar. Decaffeinated tea and coffee along with fresh lemon and lime should also be provided. Low-fat margarine, fresh fruit and salt-free spices and herbs can also be used by most people. Soy- or almond-milk can be a great substitute for cow’s milk for those with lactose intolerance.I have known of many guests with gluten intolerance or other food allergies which require strict planning for their meals. Gluten free options need to be provided for those with celiac disease. Caterers should plan for people with allergies to shell nuts, peanuts, seafood and dairy. Additionally, many people may also be allergic to eggs, wheat and soy. Make sure that these foods are kept separate and that there is no contamination while handling. Caterers should clearly mark the allergen and gluten free cookware and areas when preparing and serving the dishes. Providing clear information to all the guests will avoid any mishaps.

There are many menu options that can be suitable for people with diabetes or those on low-fat diets. Caterers may make some substitutions like roasting or stewing meat, chicken and fish instead of frying. Low-fat milk can be used in place of milk while making soups and low-fat yogurt in dishes that call for sour cream. Low-fat drinks should be provided. Caterers can also serve the dressings and sauces on the side, so that people can make their own decisions. Fruit is also a great low-fat dessert.

You can find low-sodium versions of meat and cheese can be found at the grocery store along with low-fat marinades and soups. Opting for fresh bread instead of packaged breads that may have added sodium is also a good idea. Vegetables that come canned should be rinsed to make sure to wash away the excess sodium.

I know this is a lot to think about, but with these tips you should be able to deliver a menu that will make all your guests happy. Guests who have been informed about their menu options and the details of each item to make sure that there are no misunderstandings will undoubtedly have a wedding dinner experience they will never forget.

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Child's Birthday Party

Birthday Bash for Baby

31 Oct , 2014  

Child's Birthday Party
I’ve heard parents scoff at the idea of throwing a big first birthday bash. “After all,” they reason snarkily, “the child won’t remember anything about it.” Maybe so, but my son’s party won’t just be for him–our enormous extended family wants to celebrate their precious toddler’s first year. Since an infant’s birthday party is more for family and friends than it is for the little one, entertainment planning must reflect the ages and interests of guests.One of the best things about planning a first birthday party is that this is the only year where my boy will have no opinion on theme, decor, or food. I can let my creativity loose, choosing classy or cute decorations that please me and my guests, without worry about needing to include ninjas, princesses, pirates, fossils, or heaven knows what else as I will certainly have to in years to come. I might choose a beach theme, or some clever play on his name, or whatever Pinterest and I decide is best.After gushing over my fabulous decor, adult friends and family will move on to activities that include and interest them. I love the idea of a first birthday time capsule, where relatives and friends write a note to be placed in the capsule and opened at some future date, say the child’s tenth birthday. I may also invite guests to bring something my son may like or find useful at that age to include in the capsule. A baby photo guessing game will entertain all ages, where guests bring their own cute baby photos and guess which chubby cheeks turned into what friend or relative.

There will undoubtedly be children of all ages at my toddler’s first birthday party. Games with wide appeal, such as freeze tag and relays if the weather is nice, or indoor activities such as cupcake decorating or some iteration of musical chairs will keep kids from preschool to pre-teen out of boredom-induced mischief. If cash flow is healthy, hiring a magician, clown, or other entertainer appeals to grownups and children alike, and saves hours of planning the aforementioned indoor and outdoor activities.

And while I am planning party games, it is time to consider the guest of honor himself. One of my favorite tactics for keeping a one-year-old and his peers happy is to provide an enclosed baby haven, with baby-gate boundaries and plenty of soft blocks and toys when exploration and floor time are in order. A ball pit filled with large and medium-sized balls (nothing smaller than my fist) is a sensory delight for little people. Bubbles are another winner for the toddling set, as well as for their siblings, cousins, and grown-up fans; a bubble station with plenty of wands and spill-proof containers is a first birthday must.

The key to a successful first-birthday bash is to consider the guests and plan entertainment for everyone, all while keeping the birthday boy or girl content. In years to come, my son will turn the photo album pages and “ooh” and “aah” at the evidence of his fabulous first birthday. Those hours of careful birthday party planning will have been for him, after all.

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Corporate Events

Unique and Economical Events

31 Oct , 2014  

Corporate Events

With corporations and businesses tightening their belts, it is important to keep budgeting in mind while making an event unique. Therefore the first thing I consider is how much the client is prepared to spend. Every company has its own personality and the second step is to discover what that personality is. Once I know the budget and goal of the event, I move forward. I design certain events around specific experiences like food such as pizza making, wine or beer tasting, and even sushi rolling. Within other events, I prefer to incorporate games such as casino games, bowling or arcade games. Anything in which I can utilize a variety of options that will attract diverse sub groups. Interactive activities like karaoke or the currently popular murder mystery games are an excellent way of involving guests and bringing them together.

I always keep in mind the number of guests expected in order to successfully set activities up. Very large groups of one hundred or more can be separated and grouped together in order to effectively design activities. One method I implicate is something similar to “centers” in a classroom setting. Groups of ten to fifteen can make their way through activities that culminate in a grand finale. For example, each group can plan karaoke performances using different themes and assigning specific roles to group members. Country, rock, blues, and oldies can each be divided up with someone in charge of emceeing, another to choose costumes, and other roles pertinent to a good musical performance.

With wine tastings and smaller groups, I set up seated areas with white, red, blush, and sparkling wines along with complimentary finger foods. Each area is provided raffle tickets and a winner or several winners can be chosen at the end of the evening. These winners receive a bottle of the selections available dependent on their seated area. Some guests like to exchange their selection with another guest, which again encourages guest interaction.

In all my coordinated events, food and beverages must be provided. To minimize expenses, I use these as part of the theme. Keep in mind some venues may not permit outside food or alcohol and some may not allow alcohol at all. I always make sure to check on these details before presenting plans to the client. Changing locations at the last minute will be confusing and leave the client feeling uneasy. There are also certain venues which have available space to sponsor an event, which can save a decent amount of the budget allocated for other important factors like wait staff, bartenders, DJ’s, and equipment.

Don’t wanna worry about the hassle of organizing a perfect event? Contact mitzuyankoshercatering.com and get it done for you!

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